Nutty Granola

Mixed nuts granola

My nutty granola is not your traditional recipe – there are no oats included. This grain-free version is a mixture of nuts and seeds coated in egg whites, spices, and natural sweeteners.

Store bought granola can be hard on your digestive system, not to mention many of them contain too much sweeteners and are usually made with vegetable oils (read why other fats are healthier).

Grains and nuts need proper preparation to break down enzyme inhibitors that make them hard to digest. Oats and nuts are high in phytic acid and the phytase enzymes that helps break it down is not abundant in our digestive systems. Phytic acid also binds with minerals like calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc that can lead to mineral deficiencies in high phytate diets (too much grains and high fiber foods that are not properly prepared).

I soak all my nuts in salted water overnight and dehydrate them in the oven or dehydrator. The soaking process activates phytase enzymes and reduces the nut’s phytic acid – making them easier to digest.

I chose to use egg whites in my recipe since I always have so much excess egg whites waiting in my fridge to be used (from homemade ice cream, homemade mayonnaise, or smoothies). But coconut oil and butter are good options as well. I was inspired by Sally Fallon’s Holiday Pecans recipe in Nourishing Traditions that used egg whites as a coating and decided to make my granola with a similar method.

Preparing granola in a slow cooker.

 

This post is linked to The Healthy Home Economist | Monday Mania, GNOWFGLINS | Tuesday Twister, Girlichef | Hearth and Soul Blog Hop, and Kelly The Kitchen Kop | Real Food Wednesday РLow-carb/Grain-free edition.

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Comments

    • lisa says

      Hi Jackie,
      Most commercial oats are heat treated which kills all the enzymes (and damages its oils). I would recommend you read Rami Nagel’s excellent article on preparing grains, nuts, seeds, and beans, http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/1893-living-with-phytic-acid.html.
      He recommends buying truly raw, rolled oats and soaking it in water for 24 hours at 100 degrees (can do it on a hot plate). He also suggests adding a rye starter or rye flour to “ferment” the oats. At the very least, purchase Scottish or Irish rolled oats (they are treated at lower temperatures) and consume in a diet with plenty of minerals and healthy fats; butter, organ meats, etc to balance out the mineral depleting effects of high phytate foods.

    • lisa says

      I will probably be making this daily on Passover – it’s hard to find real food snacks kosher for passover – there’s only so many eggs my kids will eat!

  1. says

    Thanks for the post on your granola. I go through the same process, and it always turns out great, although I like your spice combinations and will have to try.

    • Lisa says

      We’re big fans of cinnamon – and I love ginger, if I was making it for myself I would add in crystalized ginger (I need to figure out a sugar free version of that) and coconut flakes. But this is our version of cereal and I keep it simple for the kids and their unique food aversions.

      • SulaBlue says

        Unfortunately, the sugar is the preservative in crystalized ginger. It’s not really something you can make a sugar free version of.

        You can buy dehydrated ginger, but I suspect it has a much dryer consistency and wouldn’t be edible out of hand the way crystalized ginger is.

    • lisa says

      Hi Giffy,
      It takes 3-4 hours depending on how hot your slow cooker runs. I tend to stir it every 1/2 hour and I make this when I know I will already be in the kitchen for a few hours cooking.

    • says

      I would dehydrate the lowest temperature you can set your oven. If you do between 150-170 degrees you can leave them in there for 24 hours or until they are completely dry and crispy.

      This is one of the main reasons I got a dehydrator – I didn’t like leaving my oven on for so long.

  2. Kendy says

    Could you substitute stevia for the maple syrup? I cannot tolerate sugar in any form but I love granola. Haven’t had it in 15 years.

    • lisa says

      You could make this without any sweetener – there are plenty of spices in there to flavor it up. You could always add the stevia after if you feel it needs some. Let me know if you make it sugar-free!

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